WEEK 6: VISTA RIDGE & EAGLE CAP

$60+ DONORS GET ENTERED TO WIN 1 OF 3 KEEN BOOT CARDS

DONATE

Drawing of the KEEN Boot Cards WILL BE DONE LIVE AT TKO’s Give & Get Social event SUNDAY, December 15TH 5-8PM. COME JOIN US AND TAKE HOME ONE OF THESE PRIZES! (but you don’t have to be present to win)

TKO's GIVE & GET SOCIAL - 12/15

Can’t give $? Volunteer at the TKO + KEEN trail party and be entered to win the KEEN Boot Cards

TKO + KEEN TRAIL PARTY 12/11

Revive trails in every corner of the state.

A wildfire nearly a decade ago killed trees in a wide swath across the north slope of Mt. Hood. The fire was intense, leaving only a few islands of live trees. The Pinnacle Ridge trail and its more popular cousin, the Elk Cove trail, climb steeply through the burn and provide a northern connection to the Timberline trail, the trail which circumnavigates the mountain. This all connects to the west on Vista Ridge, a place that inspired our founders to build a nonprofit for trails in 2008 – fighting to revive a lost trail and the scenic site of Owl Point!

Predictably, the trees killed in the fire are rotting and toppling into the two trails at an accelerated rate. Hundreds of logs were bucked out by Forest Service in 2019 along Pinnacle Ridge and Elk Cove, as TKO bucked out over 50 trees from Vista Ridge. Many more will follow. Also predictably, the influx of sunlight has caused brush to grow aggressively to the point of crowding the trail.  In places it is now hard to even see the trail.

Starting in 2020, TKO will informally adopt these trails and help keep them cleared. We will assist the Forest Service in cutting logs out of the trail, when needed, and lead the charge to aggressively cut back the brush.

The Eagle Cap Wilderness in far northeast Oregon is perhaps the most rugged and beautiful hiking destination in the West. Outside of the popular Lakes Basin area in the center of the wilderness, trail use is sparse and opportunities for solitude abundant. 

Recent budget cuts have crippled trail maintenance and a backlog has increasingly fallen on the shoulders of volunteer groups. The local Wallowa Mountains Hells County Trails Association is one of those groups. For the last two summers, Trailkeepers of Oregon has been another.

TKO has taken on some of the most scenic and sparsely used trails in the wilderness.  These are short trails into the high country that make for good day hikes or overnighters. For a week at a stretch, the TKO crews have widened sketchy sections of trail, cut out fallen trees, cut back the brush, built water drainage features and constructed structures through wet areas, all while backcountry camping in some of the most beautiful alpine meadows. Horse packing support by the Forest Service has made for a comfortable camp experience.

TKO will be coming back to the Eagle Cap Wilderness in 2020 for two week-long trail parties in August, most likely the first and third weeks. Notices for the trips will likely be posted by late spring on the TKO website.

SUCCESS:

Hood River

& Eagle Vacations

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Feet of Trails Improved

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Stewardship Events

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Volunteer Participants

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In Kind Value of Volunteer Time

Old Vista Ridge:

Lost Trail, found

For more than 10 years, TKO led through stewardship to see that Old Vista Ridge trail be brought back to the Mount Hood National Forest trail system. In 2018, we celebrated that effort with new trail signs and a ribbon cutting ceremony with our Forest Service staff partners. We now hold annual events along this trail and will be gathering a large push of trail stewardship in this brilliant place, only 1.5-hours from Portland.

Echo Lake trail at Eagle Cap:

Short trails into high country 

If variety is the spice of life then the Echo Lake trail serves up quite the dish.  Starting in the meadows bordering Hurricane Creek, the trail climbs well-mannered through dense conifer forest, clamors up a rocky ridge at an impossibly steep gradient, winds gently through a lush alpine valley of grass and shrubs, and ends up on the glacier-carved shores of Echo Lake.  And yes, you can hear your voice echo off the steep cliffs surrounding the lake. The trail’s varied maintenance issues required use of most of our bag of tricks. Buck out the logs, cut back the brush, create water drainage features, fortify wet areas with rock, and toss to the side the boulders and cobbles.

Goat Creek trail:

LOGS & LIGHTNING STRIKES

The Goat Creek trail hasn’t been used in years, a result of the hundreds of logs that have fallen across it.  How do you bring such a trail back to life? One log at a time, starting from the bottom. Upon cutting out the two-hundredth log we found ourselves at the top of Huckleberry Mountain ridge looking out upon pristine alpine meadows.  A full-on lightning storm was just icing on the cake.

Falls Creek trail, Eagle Cap Ranger District

A TREK TO OREGON’S HIGHEST LAKE

The Falls Creek trail starts near the Hurricane Creek trailhead and eventually tracks to Legore Lake, Oregon’s highest. Along the way it traverses a steep hillside bog that once left hikers in shin-deep mud. We fixed that and now a rock causeway keeps the boots dry and ready for your scramble up to the 9000-foot-high lake. Or you could stop at 8000 feet and make the old mining camp and adjacent meadow a destination. Either way, your first few miles of the trail will be made easier by our work to widen the trail at the skinny sections, rebuild the trail where it had slid down the hillside, and cut back the encroaching brush.

From National Forest to County Park:

THE OTHER PUNCHBOWL FALLS

After four years and more than 30 work parties, TKO volunteers have completed a brand new trail network that explores a beautiful new county park at the confluence of the east and west forks of the Hood River. The centerpiece of the new park is Punchbowl Falls, but there is much more to see here, including bald eagles and river otters! Spring and fall are especially beautiful seasons, but the park is open year-round. You can find more information in our Oregon Hikers Field Guide.

Punchbowl Falls County Park

Latest News

Become a Volunteer Trail Ambassador!

By Cheryl Hill – TKO Trail Ambassador and author of Fire Lookouts of Oregon

You may know that you can volunteer with TKO to build and maintain trails, but did you know that you can also volunteer as a Trail Ambassador?

[…]

Call for Volunteers to serve as Trail Ambassadors

Portland, Ore. – March 3, 2022 – This spring, Trailkeepers of Oregon, the US Forest Service, Oregon State Parks  and the Mt. Hood – Columbia River Gorge Regional Tourism Alliance are kicking off another season of the Trail Ambassador Program to equip visitors with the information they need for a safe, informed, and positive experience when hiking and visiting the region. The Trail Ambassador 2022 season will kick-off on Earth Day weekend, April 23rd, and Trailkeepers of Oregon is currently seeking volunteers.

 

Volunteer Trail Ambassadors are placed at some of the busiest trailheads in the Columbia Gorge and Mt. Hood. Volunteers will have the opportunity to table at trailheads and hike the trails on weekends during peak season. Volunteers will engage with the public to answer hiking and destination related questions, promote responsible stewardship ethics, communicate about trail conditions and alternative hike information, as well as direct folks to resources such as OregonHikers.org, Ready, Set, GOrge, and land manager and partner websites.

 

Trail Ambassadors communicate key safety and trail condition information integral to both keeping folks safe and promoting stewardship of our most heavily visited recreation sites. Staying on official trails, packing out waste, being responsible with pets, and knowing about other nearby options if the destination is overcrowded, are important aspects of the program.

 

“Local volunteer Trail Ambassadors are one of the greatest assets we have in the region to help inform and inspire safe and positive hiking experiences on our trails. A warm welcome and helpful advice can make the difference in having a good vs. bad experience on a trail and that is what Trail Ambassadors can provide. And who is better at sharing a favorite post-hike lunch or brewery suggestion than a local?” said Lizzie Keenan, Regional Lead for the Mt. Hood and Columbia River Gorge Regional Tourism Alliance. 

 

Program organizers are looking for friendly, professional, outgoing individuals who enjoy informing and helping others and possess knowledge of Gorge and Mt. Hood trails. Volunteers are required to take an online training before signing up to volunteer.

 

For Trail Ambassador Program details and to sign up to volunteer, go to trailkeepersoforegon.org/trailambassadors.

 

There will be an online information sessions to answer any questions about the program. The next sessions are on March 16 at 6:30pm and April 6th at 12pm. Please register for the info sessions here.

For additional press questions, please contact Natalie Ferraro with Trailkeepers of Oregon at natalie.ferraro@trailkeepersoforegon.org

The Clackamas River Trail: a wildfire recovery primer

TKO and Forest Service staff scout and remove logs on the Clackamas River Trail during the winter.

Since cutting their saw teeth after the Eagle Creek Fire in 2017, TKO Volunteers have (unfortunately) gotten really good at using their skills to recover trails from wildfire. Mt Hood National Forest has engaged TKO to help in the rehabilitation of the Clackamas River Trail, a popular hiking destination within the Mt Hood National Forest. […]

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