WEEK 2: OREGON COAST TRAIL – NEAHKAHNIE MOUNTAIN

& SAMUEL BOARDMAN

First 100 donors receive an an exclusive 25% discount code to Hydro Flask

CLOSED, DRAWING 11/17 – $30+ donations also get entered to win 1 of 3 Hydro Flask 64 oz. Growlers filled with Base Camp Beer

DONATE

Drawing of the Hydro Flask growlers WILL BE DONE LIVE AT OUR VOLUNTEER CELEBRATION HELD AT BASE CAMP BREWING ON SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17TH 5-8PM. COME JOIN US TO SUPPORT OUR VOLUNTEERS AND TAKE HOME ONE OF THESE PRIZES! (NOT A REQUIREMENT TO WIN)

TRAILKEEPERS WELL - KEPT 11/17

Can’t give $? Volunteer at the TKO + Base Camp trail party and be entered to win 1 of the 3 Hydro Flask growlers described above.

TKO + BASE CAMP TRAIL PARTY 11/16

Support trail stewardship along the People’s Coast.

The Oregon Coast is a sight to be seen. Known as the People’s Coast for its remarkable public access, the scenic vistas and rocky shores are endlessly connected by numerous hiking trails up and down the coastline. In 2018, TKO teamed up with Oregon Coast Visitors Association and many partners in a concerted effort to build a trail stewardship movement for the Oregon Coast Trail and connective trails systems.

Neahkahnie Mountain, at Oswald West State Park is an insider’s must-hike destination. A known “gap” in the Oregon Coast Trail is south to Manzanita and TKO has helped to see 2.5 miles of new trail developed. The north and central coast regions have been a focus, and now we have a concerted effort to the south coast region in 2020. The Samuel Boardman corridor of the Oregon Coast is breathtaking and we have our sights set on making a difference throughout this area. Join us in protecting this iconic place in Oregon. The video from some of our first trail parties sums up how we engage in our mission for trail stewardship and advocacy.

SUCCESS:

OREGON COAST TRAILS

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Feet of Trails Improved

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In Kind Value of Volunteer Time

OREGON COAST TRAIL GAP PROJECT

NEAHKAHNIE MOUNTAIN, SOUTH TO MANZANITA

In 2015, TKO wrote a letter of support for a project to address a gap in the OCT between the South Neahkahnie Mt. trailhead of Oswald West State Park and the town of Manzanita. As it stands, hikers are limited to walking the busy should of Hwy. 101. Years later, the trail is under construction and TKO has been steadily helping in seeing the development through. The project had many challenges, but TKO helped in the final stages of approval by committing to being a lifelong partner in maintenance. The trail opens in the spring of 2020. Join us to help with the finishing touches throughout the winter and see how the development is shaping up.

TKO + BASE CAMP TRAIL PARTY 11/16 @ NK Mt.

TKO Engages the South Coast

SAMUEL BOARDMAN

Phase 2 of our Oregon Coast Visitors Association funding is going to help us build a movement of trail stewardship in the southern Oregon Coast region. We’ve signed volunteer agreements with Oregon State Parks Harris Beach Management Unit, assessed trails to build a portfolio of projects to tackle and have an internship position to help drum up a beat of stewardship within communities that are eager to get out and improve their trails. Short term funding is here now, but we need a long term approach. That’s where you can come in!

DONATE

Closed for 12 years:

Cascade Head’s Rainforest Trail

TKO has been busy on many segments of the Oregon Coast Trail. From Ecola all the way down to Lincoln City, we got after stewardship efforts and found a real need from our partners and land managers to step up. Not long after starting our efforts in August of 2018, Siuslaw National Forest staff reached out to TKO and we came with tools in hand. We have steadily worked to bring the trail close to opening, after the mighty wind storms of 2008. Come join us this week to get after it, we may just have a bunk bed for you too!

CASCADE HEAD TRAIL PARTY 11/15
CASCADE HEAD TRAIL PARTY 11/16

Latest News

Trail Ambassador Season Wrap-Up

Dear Ambassadors,

Congratulations on the 2020 season! With challenges seemingly around every corner, it was certainly not an easy road, but we still accomplished some big things. I am so grateful for each and everyone of you who participated this year, either by signing up for a volunteer shift or by just staying in the loop by being on the email list.

We kicked off the season by collaborating on and premiering the first online Trail Ambassador Training. A big shout out to the volunteers who helped to design and give feedback on the training, and to those who contributed their voices. Thanks to the online training, we were able to overcome the ban on public gatherings and had over 30 volunteers gear up to be ambassadors, with about 50% of those folks being new to the program this year. 

Even though the pandemic ultimately meant we were limited to only four open trailheads, those of you who went out had a big impact. Huge thank you to the volunteers who got out there and set up their physically distanced Ambassador stations in the face of uncertain trail openings, and an unprecedented amount of use on public lands this summer. You answered questions for over 200 hikers, helped to normalize mask wearing on the trail, and provided valuable on-the-ground feedback for land managers. 

It’s been exciting to see so many of you get involved with the new On-trail Ambassador program that we recently debuted. By eliminating the need for public interaction, we hope this will provide an opportunity for more folks to be active in the program during what continues to be a challenging year. We decided to offer this volunteer opportunity year round, in the hopes that it will prove to be a useful feedback tool for land managers and a great way for you to stay active as an Ambassador through the rainy portion of the hiking season.

This year saw the Trail Ambassador program emerge as a network capable of innovation, flexibility and teamwork. We forged new relationships with our sister programs in Washington state, on the Oregon Coast, and with our friends in the River Ambassador program. Through this network of collaboration, volunteers were able to get out to trails and beaches on the North Coast, our volunteer training was able to be more inclusive, and we helped advise a fledgling Ambassador program near Seattle. We showed just how powerful the network model can be, and I can’t wait to see what we accomplish next year. 

In a year where many things were uncertain, you kept the heart of this program beating. No matter what the next year brings, I look forward to continuing the good work of this program with a stellar group of volunteers, stakeholders and partners. Thank you for your dedication to the program and to Oregon’s trails.

 

Natalie Ferraro | Engagement Manager

natalie.ferraro@trailkeepersoforegon.org

 

Interview with a Volunteer – Claudio

 

A photo of Crew Leader Claudio Berstein

Crew Leader Claudio Berstein

Bringing the Trail Crew to you! This is a continuation of our “Interview with a Volunteer” series that we’ll be using to bring the fun of being a Trailkeeper to you while you stay safe at home. […]

Hiking in Virtual Time

By Tom Kloster

After the Eagle Creek Fire in September 2017, I know I was not alone in
sorting through photos and trip reports from before the fire. While it has
taken time for all of us to absorb the changes the fire brought to the Gorge,
seeing old photos of our favorite places from years passed was a needed
escape. […]

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